Friday, October 17, 2014

Logstash to parse Local files,apache/niginx Logs

Filters in logstach 
Filters are an in-line processing mechanism which provide the flexibility to slice and dice your data to fit your needs. Let’s see one in action, namely the grok filter.

input { stdin { } }

filter {
  grok {
    match => { "message" => "%{COMBINEDAPACHELOG}" }
  }
  date {
    match => [ "timestamp" , "dd/MMM/yyyy:HH:mm:ss Z" ]
  }
}

output {
  elasticsearch { host => localhost }
  stdout { codec => rubydebug }
}
Run logstash with this configuration:

bin/logstash -f logstash-filter.conf
Now paste this line into the terminal (so it will be processed by the stdin input):

127.0.0.1 - - [11/Dec/2013:00:01:45 -0800] "GET /xampp/status.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3891 "http://cadenza/xampp/navi.php" "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10.9; rv:25.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/25.0"


Run Logstash from Local File buy configuring input session. Below we parse a apache access log from local server. 

input {
  file {
    path => "/Users/kurt/logs/access_log"
    start_position => beginning
  }
}

filter {
  if [path] =~ "access" {
    mutate { replace => { "type" => "apache_access" } }
    grok {
      match => { "message" => "%{COMBINEDAPACHELOG}" }
    }
  }
  date {
    match => [ "timestamp" , "dd/MMM/yyyy:HH:mm:ss Z" ]
  }
}

output {
  elasticsearch {
    host => localhost
  }
  stdout { codec => rubydebug }
}

Logstach Configuration for parsing nginx Logs 

input {
  file {
    path => "/Users/kurt/logs/access_log"
    start_position => beginning
  }
}

filter {
  if [path] =~ "access" {
    mutate { replace => { "type" => "apache_access" } }
    grok {
      match => { "message" => "%{COMBINEDAPACHELOG}" }
    }
  }
  date {
    match => [ "timestamp" , "dd/MMM/yyyy:HH:mm:ss Z" ]
  }
}

output {
  elasticsearch {
    host => localhost
  }
  stdout { codec => rubydebug }
}

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